For best experience please turn on javascript and use a modern browser!
uva.nl
Research

ArtScience

Science and art have a long history of entanglement. At the IAS we aim to discover domains where art and science converge to forge new, emergent knowledge practices, and in so doing, push humanistic inquiry in new and demanding directions.

Foto: Joel Filipe, Unsplash

In recent years, the exchange of knowledge, techniques, and materials between science and art has become more important than ever. Scientists and engineers are increasingly drawing on the techniques and practices of art and design to probe, experiment with, and conceptualise their work in more creative and critical ways (e.g., from imaging and sound technologies in biomedicine and life science research to design and architecture in synthetic biology and bioengineering). Likewise, artists and designers are more likely than ever to incorporate the various knowledges and practices of the experimental, theoretical, and computational sciences into their research-based work.

Scientific Lead

prof. dr. C.M.K.E. (Christa-Maria) Lerm-Hayes

Faculty of Humanities

Capaciteitsgroep Kunstgeschiedenis

Artist in Residence

Orion Maxted

Complexity and Theater
Personal page

Previous ArtScience activities at the IAS

Exhibition "Bio-inspired Art and Architecture" at UvA Special Collections, 23-27 October 2017

Together with Museum Vrolik and UvA Special Collections, we have organised a special exhibition inspired by D'Arcy Thompson's famous book. The exhibition "Bio-inspired Art and Architecture" combines art work by Gemma Anderson and natural objects from the university collection. The exhibition was set up as part of an intensive scientific workshop at the IAS.

Watch the video for a short impression:

Bart de Smit on the mathematics behind Escher, 22 Januari 2019

Mathematician Bart de Smit spoke about the mathematics behind Esscher's famous images at the Symposium "Road to Reality".  The central question: How to complete an Escher painting using mathematics?

Watch the full lecture: